Perfectly happy Olsberg saves a lot of material while punching. How do they do it? With the new TruPunch 5000.

“Punching without a scrap skeleton is primarily a question of programming,” says Stephan Schlömer.

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Perfectly happy

When the TruPunch 5000 has finished its work, there’s nothing left on the machine table, not even a narrow edge strip. Olsberg tried out skeleton-free punching.

 It almost looks as though a finished jigsaw puzzle is being dismantled piece by piece. The parts are closely spaced, edge to edge. The TruPunch 5000 punches one piece after the other and automatically discharges them. The punching machine also uses fast strokes to break down the last strip of the sheet metal which is then disposed of through the parts flap. And what’s left on the work table is quite simply — nothing. Pierre Lipina, machine operator at Olsberg, does not need to remove any scrap skeletons, left over strips or other remnants by hand. The TruPunch 5000 takes care of this automatically.

“We can work right into the area between the clamps and thus punch the last remaining strip,” says machine operator Pierre Lipina.

The new TruPunch 5000, designed to eliminate the scrap skeleton, offers significant advantages in the production process. “We can work right into the area between the clamps and thus punch the last remaining strip,” says Lipina. “In this way we save up to 30 percent on material, even when the parts are complex in shape.” One impressive example from real-world practice: Olsberg now takes a sheet of copper four millimeters thick and punches out 140 instead the previous 104 link plates. Since that sheet of copper currently costs 1,000 euros, the savings are considerable. What’s more, the processing time per part, following additional tool optimization, has dropped from 9.5 to 8.1 seconds.

A system for success

“We need the latest in manufacturing technology and should, if at all possible, be a step ahead of the state of the art,” emphasizes Stephan Schlömer, an executive and at Olsberg the manager for manufacturing and logistics in the field of systems technology. Equipped this way, Olsberg has also offered its expertise to industrial customers for many years. “The systems manufacturing department created in this way achieves double-digit growth rates.”

The recipe for success: Olsberg offers complete solutions — starting with development and continuing through manufacturing, assembly, inspection, and on to logistics services. The objective is not just to be a simple supplier but rather to generate a large share of sales with complete assemblies. The technical knowledge needed for this has been accumulated over many years of developing and producing night storage heaters. In addition to the foundry operations and the wood-burning and pellet stoves, systems manufacturing technology is one of the business units in this family-owned operation, whose roots reach back into the 16th century.

Olsberg now takes a sheet of copper four millimeters thick and punches out 140 instead the previous 104 link plates. Since that sheet of copper currently costs 1,000 euros, the savings are considerable.

Splendid results

To continue to be as flexible as possible, this medium-sized company banks on in-house production. “Vertical integration is so great we ourselves make 60 percent on average in systems manufacturing technology,” says Stephan Schlömer. Metalworking plays a major role here; four punching machines are in service at Olsberg, including the new TruPunch 5000. “We have attained clear rises in sales figures especially when dealing with intricate sheet metal parts.

The TRUMPF equipment is especially well suited for this range. That is why we decided to buy the TruPunch 5000,” Schlömer explains. In addition, our customers require surfaces that are entirely free of scratches, on both sides. TRUMPF, with its retractable die, has come up with a fine solution.”

Getting better together

The decision to purchase a new punching machine was made during the development phase for the TruPunch 5000 — the newest punching innovation with the additional feature that eliminates the scrap skeleton. This is hardly new territory for Stephan Schlömer. “We had already eliminated 95 percent of all scrap skeletons in the past. It’s primarily a question of programming methods.”

The operator always has a clear view of what’s going on.

hat is why this development partnership proved to be of benefit to both parties. TRUMPF built vital practical hints from Olsberg’s specialists into this new machine. Olsberg, as a test customer, obtained detailed insights into the capabilities the new punching machine offers. “No one can take away the competitive advantage resulting from the process,” Schlömer summarizes with satisfaction.

Newly thought out

The two companies joined forces above all to refine the software. This is because machining without a scrap skeleton requires a degree of rethinking when programming the jobs, explained Gregor Dicke, a programmer at Olsberg. “The main difference is to turn your attention away from the individual component and toward the sheet as a whole.” Dicke sees an important advantage of the new system in that the machine operator himself has more capacity. “Competence is now being shifted toward the operator. When working with a new part, he can optimize the details of the process directly. No longer is it necessary to get the programming department involved.”

 

Any questions?

Contact us: MastersofSheetMetal@trumpf.com

 This article was first published in autumn 2012.



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Housings specialist

Who:

Olsberg Hermann Everken GmbH, Olsberg, Germany. First documented mention in 1577. Current organization set up in 1992. 480 employees. www.olsberg.com

What:

Tradition-steeped, family-owned company; foundry for castings using flake and nodular graphite; development, manufacture and sales of wood- and pellet-fired stoves as well as electrical heaters and ventilators. In systems manufacturing technology, the most recent field of business, Olsberg supplies individual parts, assemblies and complete units made of steel sheet to industrial customers in various sectors

How:

Among the equipment Olsberg uses are
2 x TruPunch 5000, TrumaBend V 130 X, and TC 500 R-13

In addition to the foundry operations and the wood-burning and pellet stoves, systems manufacturing technology is one of the business units in this family-owned operation.


Olsberg employs 480 people. The roots of this family-owned operation reach back into the 16th century.


The parts are closely nested during the programming phase.


The machine rotates the parts. A deflector below the parts chute separates good parts from scrap.


The DisposeMaster automatically sorts the chopped skeleton and the punching scrap according to the type of material.


“Even with complex part geometries, we can cut material consumption by as much as 30 percent,” explains Stephan Schlömer.

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